RESEARCH & RESOURCES

Business Intelligence Journal Volume 21 Number 4 cover

Business Intelligence Journal | Vol. 21, No. 4

December 14, 2016

As Strother Martin’s warden told Paul Newman’s troublesome prisoner in the 1967 film Cool Hand Luke, “What we’ve got here is failure to communicate.” Communication is vital to BI project success and project management is the subject of several articles in this issue of the Business Intelligence Journal.

Authors John Lucker, David Hendrawirawan, and Courtney Parry examine causes of—and solutions for—communication disconnects between data architects and their audiences. They use a case study from a large U.S. bank to explain how their best practices worked.

How do you measure project success? Is it more than just completing a project on time and under budget? Senior editor Hugh J. Watson and coauthors Hauke Heier, Hans P. Borgman, and Fabiano G. Neves examine a new study about what influences perceptions of project success and add insights from their own experiences.

Our 2016 Best Practice Awards winners are further evidence of the range of project success your colleagues have enjoyed in a wide variety of industries.

Security is another focus of this issue of the Journal. Troy Hiltbrand explains how advanced analytics can automate the discovery and prevention of fraudulent transactions, saving enterprises millions. He explores the need for creating a training data set to help us understand today’s fraud by examining past activity, and how models must change as new fraud methods are employed.

Ravi Chandran, Norman C. Nicholl, and Tracy Ring examine the dynamics of moving to the cloud, including addressing questions of security.

Linda Briggs explores why operational intelligence is key to commercial drone adoption and discusses how improving drone safety helps organizations take drones beyond the “visual line of sight” current regulations require.

What do you do with all the data a drone collects? Steve Williams looks at the “cognitive era,” when unstructured data is converted into usable information for decision support. He discusses how to formulate a successful strategy for creating a next-gen decision support system.

Timothy Sullivan, Eric Hixson, Andrew Proctor, Christopher Kucharik, and Timothy Crone explain how the Cleveland Clinic used lean methods to become more effective and efficient in their business intelligence.

We welcome your comments at jpowell@tdwi.org.

James E. Powell

Editorial Director

Business Intelligence Journal 

 


 IN THIS ISSUE
  • BI Project Success Is in the Eye of the Beholder
    Hugh J. Watson, Hauke Heier, Hans P. Borgman, and Fabiano G. Neves
  • The Articulate Architect: A Practical Approach for Communicating With Business Stakeholders
    David Hendrawirawan, John Lucker, and Courtney Parry
  • Fighting Fraud with Advanced Analytics
    Troy Hiltbrand
  • Drone Safety Calls for Complex Event Processing, Operational Intelligence
    Linda L. Briggs
  • Outthink Cognitive Hype: Creating a Business-Driven Cognitive Strategy
    Steve Williams
  • BI Experts’ Perspective: Avoiding Storms in Your Move to the Cloud
    Ravi Chandran, Norman C. Nicholl, and Tracy Ring
  • Using Lean Methods to Advance the Business Intelligence and Analytics Organization
    Timothy Sullivan; Eric Hixson, Ph.D.; Andrew Proctor; Christopher Kucharik; and Timothy Crone, MD
  • Winners: TDWI Best Practices Awards 2016


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