RESEARCH & RESOURCES

TDWI Business Intelligence Journal, Volume 13, Number 2

From the Editor

IT and business users often seem to be miles apart when it comes to understanding how to achieve a successful business intelligence project. In this issue we examine ways that these diverse groups can build a bridge over very troubled waters.

Business Intelligence Journal

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IT and business users often seem to be miles apart when it comes to understanding how to achieve a successful business intelligence project. In this issue we examine ways that these diverse groups can build a bridge over very troubled waters.

Jeff Reagan suggests one way to bridge the IT/user gap: virtual prototyping. Reagan explains how this approach can help the project team better align business users and IT while guarding against cost overruns. Prototypes provide a means to validate requirements and design decisions and spot data quality issues, and can do so at a fraction of the time and cost of the traditional physical prototype.

Mark Kromer and Daniel Yu describe another approach that helps a BI team get and keep projects on track. The authors examine how using a proof-of-concept can drive home BI’s business value and win attention and adoption for your BI project from executives and management. The proof of concept will also help solidify requirements and set proper expectations, reducing project delays and rework.

When it comes to BI’s business value, don’t think just of your own enterprise. Alan Eisman suggests that by sharing information with partners in your supply chain—using everything from balanced scorecards to KPIs—you can improve efficiency, reduce inventories, and improve customer delivery. Now that’s value.

Of course, once BI projects take off and return that superior value, business users may begin to take them for granted. Our Experts’ Perspective column suggests how you can install enthusiasm and revitalize interest in BI in just such circumstances. There are many elements that IT needs to align, including investments, resources, business values, and imperatives. As Julianna DeLua discusses, a common data foundation is the only viable way to make this alignment a reality in today’s competitive business environment. Alex Chaves-Sanz and Ihsan Al-Awamy look at another decision for IT and BI users to examine together: whether a BI business suite or a collection of best-of-breed applications is the best approach to satisfying a company’s BI needs.

Also in this issue, senior editor Hugh J. Watson looks at where BI software is headed; our Q&A with TDWI Research analyst Philip Russom digs into his latest report on data governance best practices; and our case study shows how a familiar auto club drove up data quality. We’re always interested in your comments about our publication and specific articles you’ve enjoyed. Please send me your comments and feedback: jpowell@1105media.com.


Download the Business Intelligence Journal, Volume 13, Number 2, as a PDF:

This article originally appeared in the issue of Transforming Data with Intelligence.

About the Author

James E. Powell is the editorial director of the Business Intelligence Journal and BI This Week newsletter.

jpowell@tdwi.org


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